Depression and The Black Dog

Depression affects millions of people worldwide.  According to Statistics Canada’s 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey on Mental Health, 1 in 8 adults identified symptoms that met criteria for a mood disorder at some point during their lifetime, including 11.3% for depression.  Interestingly, 15-24 year-olds had the highest rates of mood and anxiety disorders of all age groups.

The Black Dog video depicts depression as a black dog. When you first meet him, he may seem quite small, making appearances at random moments, causing you to be more emotional than usual, all while draining your resources to make himself bigger. He does this by running you down and making you tired. Next will come the lack of motivation and loss of previously enjoyed interests. This may begin to impact your daily functioning, for instance game nights with your family, dance parties with your friends or hiking on the weekend with the kids becomes chore-like. Subsequently, this may impact your sleep whereby you may want to sleep all day or have difficulties falling or staying asleep. The black dog will appear seeking your attention and reminding you of your troubles, causing you to feel restless and irritable. As the dog requires more of your attention, you may feel angry, anxious, unfocused and empty.  He may grow so big that the only thing you will feel is hopelessness.

With acknowledgement and help, you can get rid of your black dog. The black dog may convince you that nothing will help, however seeking a professional to help you learn how to talk back to the black dog will provide you with the tools to feel better.  At The Therapy Centre, all of our psychologists and therapists are well trained in treating depression and help people on a daily basis.  We serve people in Oakville, Burlington, Milton, Mississauga as well as Hamilton and the surrounding area.   If you are struggling with depression, please call our office at 289-291-0205.

Related Links of Interest:
Depression Counselling & Therapy Services
Child & Teen Depression and Bipolar Disorder

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